Now you can track movements of sharks

Now you can track movements of sharks

It is the Week of the Sharks throughout the year at Ocearch, an organization dedicated to providing data on marine to scientists. He has tagged 416 animals, including whales, turtles, seals and dolphins. But the star of this story are the sharks.

You can see the trip of animals tagged in semi-real time while they ping your location on ocearch.org. You’ll see that Miss May, a female white , was circling around Frying Pan Shoals in North Carolina at 11:04 p.m. on June 18. Jane, another white female, is relaxing next to Nags Head on the Outer Banks (the last time she did ping her location there was at 11:07 a.m. on June 18). Cabot, a male white , has been a traveler, making his way from Nova Scotia to South Florida and all the way north to Maine again. The last time he checked in with the scientists was at 5:42 a.m. on June 14.

We saw lots of dolphins, saw lots of different fish, but seeing sharks was very rare, they were out there, don’t get me wrong, but they were generally below the surface where the general public and even coast guards didn’t see them.